Indoor Interval Workouts

One of the biggest problems my clients face when choosing to move workouts indoors without cardiovascular equipment is keeping their heart rates up over a period of time.  At home they get bored easily and in other locations they may not be able to move fast enough long enough to really be effective. An easy way to reach your cardiovascular workout goals, keep from getting bored, and fit your routine inside is interval training.

In addition to cardio work, interval training can be strength training as well, giving you two workouts in one, as in the case of a super circuit routine. The trick is to watch your heart rate and set enough cardiovascular stations in between your strength moves to keep your heart rate up appropriately. It is not advisable that you lift the weight much faster than two to four seconds up, pause, and lower at the same rate. Lifting faster can increase your risk of injury and is likely to create an element of physics rather than your muscle in the movement. You could lift slower which challenges your muscle and mental focus differently and may be effective if you can maintain your elevated heart rate with enough cardiovascular stations.

When deciding how to move cardiovascular work inside it is important to consider your budget, what if any equipment you may need, the location you wish to workout in, your safety, and if you can realistically reach your cardiovascular needs in the new location. How will you retain your motivation as the activity becomes repetitive, and will you continue to push yourself as you become accustomed to the activities? Will you do a form of interval training, if so where and how will you get it done? Get creative – there are many options in our community for becoming active, even in the darkness of winter which is approaching, even if slowly.

Good Equipment for A Home Gym

Are you one of those people who just can’t seem to get to the gym – ever? You have great intentions and are ready to commit but for multiple reasons you just don’t seem to have the time to get down the road to the gym. If you are motivated a home workout can be just as effective and may be more rewarding than a visit to the health club.

Good Equipment for Your Home Gym

Setting up a home gym requires a little planning and can be very affordable. First you’ll want to evaluate your current fitness level and your fitness goals and then make sure to have equipment on hand to help you progress from where you are to where you want to go. Equipment to consider:

Dumbbells / hand weights – sizes will depend on your current level and goals. Typically sold price/pound so keep that in mind when deciding how much you really need

Rubber tubbing – most brands yellow is easiest & blue or black hardest. Check brands for resistance weight of their color matrix to be sure. Heavy lifters – you can purchase braided tubing for increased resistance – you’ll be surprised at the amount of difficulty it creates.

A bench – is using a home decoration/functional bench make sure it is stable enough to be safe and offer you full range of motion during your exercises.

Step – stairs in your home work just fine if you’ll use them

Medicine balls and/or kettle bells – easier to hold for some exercises than dumbbells but not a necessity to have both DB and medicine balls/kettle bells. BOSU or other stability challenging device – air steps, discs, dots, foam rollers, etc

Good home exercises are as plentiful as those in the gym free weight area provided you are creative when purchasing your equipment and finding space. You’ll want to make sure you have enough space to complete the exercises through full range of motion without destroying your home – it actually takes very little space if you can be creative with your movements – but stay safe. Consider home much furniture you’ll realistically move around daily. Many drop their home workouts because it is too much work in the space they have designated and remember – the best workout is one you will do!