Exercising Sore Muscles, Using Active Rest

We’ve all had those days when we wake up and know we did something active the day or two before. Delayed onset soreness isn’t uncommon but can affect how you feel about exercise, your body, and your fitness accomplishments. Exercising sore muscles can help. If you injured yourself during an activity but don’t need immediate medical care active rest can help, too but first some basic first aid can help.

The best thing is to train ahead of time. If you have failed to practice or train ahead of time there are some things you can do to get over those aches and pains with relatively little couch (whine) time. According to physical therapist Jim Rauzi, of the Center for Muscle and Joint Therapy in Superior, WI, “go for ice. You can usually do right by ice. Many people reach for heat because it feels good, however, heat keeps the injury bleeding which can cause more damage. You are better off to reach for ice if you need something right away. “

Follow R.I.C.E.: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. It is important to understand how your injury is affected by movement. “Once you are able, you’ll want to follow immediate treatments with active rest,” says Rauzi.

Active rest means find movement you can do which does not affect the injured areas. If it feels ok, there is a school of thought and some research to support moving in the same pattern which created the soreness. In other words, if you are sore from walking, walk some. Use a slower pace and include stretching. Sorry, but it sounds like laying on the couch may not be the best alternative. You should get up and move, possibly do a little bit of stretching.

Whatever you decide to do it should not hurt more. It should help you feel better, and remember, this is not to treat or take the place of doctor’s advice, make sure you communicate with your health care professional.

Tips for Weekend Warriors

Are you a weekend warrior? You know, the people who go all out each weekend as if they were as nimble as they once were. Yet, they are the ones on the couch nursing (or should I say whining about) their aching back, hip, arm, shoulder, elbow, head, whatever for the next two days!

Are you a weekend warrior? You know, the people who go all out each weekend as if they were as nimble as they once were. Yet, they are the ones on the couch nursing (or should I say whining about) their aching back, hip, arm, shoulder, elbow, head, whatever for the next two days! My former professor wrote a book on retiring from athletics gracefully, a tough but necessary rite of passage. We try to hang onto former levels of activity, however, we are no longer practicing at the same level, which means we are no longer at the same level. A hard realization, I know.
According to Jim Rauzi, physical therapist with the Center for Muscle and Joint Therapy in Superior, WI, the first part of understanding the pains associated with weekend warrior type activity is to accept that you are experiencing a little (in some cases a lot) more activity than you are used to. No matter what you used to do, you no longer work at that level and accepting that you cannot jump into activity the same way is crucial. Ideally, you should be training for your events. Train for golf outings, sports leagues, 5-Ks, and other activities you know are taxing. Many people feel this is overkill, however, those who train feel much better after the race and are much less likely to suffer a debilitating injury.

For those of you with time before the big event consider training to help you perform your best. The biggest mistake I see is overestimating what the body can do based on old memories of what it did. Yea, you used to be able to run, skate, tumble, row, ride that fast or further. Unfortunately, you haven’t been training and at one time you practiced those activities.

More on training for an event next time.