How To Banish Burnout At Work And At Home

Burnout is, according to Healthline, “a state of mental and physical exhaustion that can zap the joy out of your career, friendships, and family interactions.” And it is a very real phenomenon that many professionals experience at some level throughout their careers. Fortunately, career burnout is something you can thwart before your light begins to fade. Here are some practical tips to beat burnout both at work and at home.

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Image via Pexels

Guest Post By: Cheryl Conklin

At Work

  • Be a better leader. When you have great leadership skills, your employees will never have to question what they need to do, how it needs to be done, and when. They will look up to you as a mentor instead of simply the person that signs their paycheck. Once you refine your leadership skills, you can easily lead your organization through good and bad times with the kind of positive mindset people find contagious.
  • Enhance your education. Leadership is just one business skill you can sharpen to be more effective in the office. It is never too late — and you never have too much or too little experience — to pursue mastery in other areas. Business management and marketing are two of these, and pursuing a business degree online will allow you to continue to work while improving your professional acumen.
  • Improve company morale. Career burnout is often caused in part by the negative attitudes of those within your organization. This is an easy remedy, and you can improve employee morale by maintaining an open line of communication and recognizing a job well done. Connecteam points out that simple recognition motivates more than three-quarters of employees. This can lead to greater productivity and less stress throughout your entire organization.

At Home

  • Vacation often. Taking a vacation — even a quick weekend trip — increases mindfulness and can give your brain a much-needed boost. While you may not be able to enjoy a lengthy sabbatical, do prioritize family vacations or solo sojourns every few months. After each trip, you’ll notice you are much more productive and positive than you were before your sabbatical.
  • Leave work at work. 50 — this is the number of hours that the American Institute of Stress says pushes most American workers toward feelings of burnout. As an executive, you may be tempted to work from the office five days a week and respond to emails and telephone calls in your off-hours. Limit this as much as possible, and make sure that your superiors and subordinates are aware of your boundaries. Remember, you have to have personal time to be most productive during your professional time.
  • Engage in healthy habits. The actions you take each day to better your health will help you keep your flame burning bright at work and at home. Health threats, such as sleep deprivation, malnutrition, and untamed stress, will follow you to the office and stick around long after you’ve clocked out. Do yourself a favor and get plenty of sleep, eat well, and exercise. These — along with other healthy habits, including socializing and keeping a clean home — will go a long way toward beating career fatigue.

Career burnout is an alarming phenomenon that can leave you stagnant in your career, no matter how close to the top you climb. But you can avoid it by taking steps now to improve your work and home environment. The above tips are a great place to start. 

Does burnout have you feeling overwhelmed and depressed? Dr. Stacy’s seven-day course can get you to shift your mindset to get back on track.